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Australia Historic buildings -- Tasmania With digital objects
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Former Bridge Hotel at Ouse

Colour landscape photograph shows exterior of derelict Bridge Hotel at Ouse, situated in the crook of the Ouse River, a sandstone, weatherboard and tin structure, with windows boarded up

View of Clifton Priory atop Barrack Hill, Bothwell

Colour photograph of Clifton Priory, Bothwell, showing gardens, lawn and hedge below front door. National heritage register citation is as follows: “Two storey stone Tudor Gothic house built in 1847-8 by Rev. Robert Wilson from public subscription. Wilson caused a scandal when he ran into financial difficulties and sold it owing a considerable sum. The house is magnificently sited on Barrack Hill from where it enjoys fine views of Bothwell, the Clyde River and surrounding countryside.”

View of Clifton Priory and powerlines across front lawn

Colour photograph of Clifton Priory, Bothwell, showing powerlines across front lawn below hedge. National heritage register citation is as follows: “Two storey stone Tudor Gothic house built in 1847-8 by Rev. Robert Wilson from public subscription. Wilson caused a scandal when he ran into financial difficulties and sold it owing a considerable sum. The house is magnificently sited on Barrack Hill from where it enjoys fine views of Bothwell, the Clyde River and surrounding countryside.”

Former Coffee Palace, doctor’s surgery and hotel at Bothwell

Colour photograph of former coffee palace, hotel and doctor’s surgery at 90 Dalrymple Street Bothwell. Citation on National heritage register: “A two storey brick and stucco Georgian building with a stone rear section, licensed as the Young Queen from 1851-1877 when the name was changed to Maskell's Hotel. The building appears in a book on Colonial architecture by Hardy Wilson with a crinolined lady at the doorway with luggage and bird cage. The building is an important townscape element.”

Ruins of church at Port Arthur

Black-and-white photograph shows ruins of the church at Port Arthur, damaged by fire in 1884,with charred timber framework in the roof, remnant shingles on the roof and climbing plants covering the sandstone of the church walls. Handwritten words “Church at Port Arthur” in lower left corner of image.

Buildings on Salamanca Place

Black-and-white photograph shows stone buildings along Salamanca Place, timber stacked on New Wharf and masts of ships docked at the wharf; signs on buildings for “A.E. Lord Wool Merchant” and “W.D. Peacock and Co.”, historic home Lenna and eastern conservatory visible on hilltop behind towards Battery Point; maritime signal station with the Time Ball that was dropped automatically at 1pm, after a relayed telegraph signal from the Melbourne Observatory.

People standing outside former Coffee Palace, Bothwell

Colour photograph of people standing beside motor vehicles parked outside former coffee palace, hotel and doctor’s surgery at 90 Dalrymple Street Bothwell. Citation on National heritage register: “A two storey brick and stucco Georgian building with a stone rear section, licensed as the Young Queen from 1851-1877 when the name was changed to Maskell's Hotel. The building appears in a book on Colonial architecture by Hardy Wilson with a crinolined lady at the doorway with luggage and bird cage. The building is an important townscape element.”

Stone cottage with shingle roof

Colour photograph of stone cottage at Callington Mill, Oatlands, with weatherbeaten timber shingles, surrounded by wire mesh and paling fence around small garden, with nearby livestock pens.

Hal Wyatt

Elevated view of church ruins at Port Arthur

Black-and-white photograph shows elevated view of ruined church at Port Arthur, including charred timber roof framework; with view of waterfront and other buildings on Port Arthur site; cut hay is drying in paddock at front of church.

Bath Inn at Oatlands

Colour photograph of sandstone building with tin roof, geraniums blooming in front garden, Bath Inn, at Oatlands, Tasmania

Hal Wyatt

Clifton Priory atop Barrack Hill, Bothwell

Colour photograph of Clifton Priory, Bothwell. National heritage register citation is as follows: “Two storey stone Tudor Gothic house built in 1847-8 by Rev. Robert Wilson from public subscription. Wilson caused a scandal when he ran into financial difficulties and sold it owing a considerable sum. The house is magnificently sited on Barrack Hill from where it enjoys fine views of Bothwell, the Clyde River and surrounding countryside.”

Road to Government House, on Gun Carriage Drive

Black-and-white photograph taken looking north along Gun Carriage Drive towards Government House, Hobart, with post-and-rail fences on Derwent River side; a horse harnessed to a four-wheel carriage, is on the left of the road; a small jetty extends from the shoreline and a boat is visible through the trees, anchored just off shore.